MOSES AND AKHENATEN AHMED OSMAN PDF DOWNLOAD

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Moses and Akhenaten and millions of other books are available for site site. . Christianity: An Ancient Egyptian Religion by Ahmed Osman Paperback $ . Get your site here, or download a FREE site Reading App. Moses and Akhenaten by Ahmed Osman - A reinterpretation of biblical and Egyptian history that shows Moses and the Pharaoh Akhenaten to be one and the same. • The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus. By Ahmed Osman. Trade Paperback. eBook. LIST PRICE $ . Resources and Downloads. Moses and Akhenaten One and the Same Person by Ahmed Osman - Download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read online. moses.


Moses And Akhenaten Ahmed Osman Pdf Download

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Osman Moses and Akhenaten one and the same person By Ahmed Osman The leading the Download PDF Moses and Akhenaten The Secret History of Free. ―Now this Moses plainly taught to the children of Israel in the wilderness, and . by Ted Loukes Moses and Akhenaten by Ahmed Osman The Legacy of Moses. 1, Pages·· MB·22, Downloads·New! The Reference Manual on Scientific Evidence, Third Edition, assists judges in managing cases.

Osman wants to p This book presents an interesting twist in the attempts to match Biblical chronology with the archaeological evidence.

Ahmed Osman (author)

Osman wants to prove that Moses and Akhenaten are the same person, and he presents information to that end. The evidence does not demand his conclusion, but his conclusion is supported by the evidence as presented.

This book is a great addition to my collection of ancient mysteries books. Aside from that, it's nothing more than pseudo-history and relies on a superficial understanding of Judeo-Christian theology.

Score for the freedom of speech, though. Cetainly this is more believeable than many religious ideas. The clean yellow sand slope gently down to the river. Here Akhenaten built his new capital, Akhetaten, the Horizon of Aten, where he and his followers could be free to worship their God. Huge boundary stelae, marking the limits of the city and recording the story of its foundation, were carved in the surrounding cliffs. Akhenaten was a capital city possessed of both dignity and architectural harmony.

Its main streets ran parallel to the Nile with the most important of them, the Kings Way, connecting the citys most prominent buildings, including the Kings House where Akhenaten and his family lived their private family life. To the south of the house was the kings private Temple to Aten. The Great Temple of Aten, a huge building constructed on an east-west axis, lay less than a quarter of a mile to the north along the Kings Way. It was entered through a pylon from the highway and a second entrance gave access to a hypostyle hall called the House of Rejoice of Aten.

The house of the high priest Pa-Nehesy lay outside the enclosures south-east corner. Akhenaten gave tombs, gouged out of the face of the cliffs surrounding his city, to those officials who had rallied to him.

In the reliefs which the nobles carved for themselves in these tombs showing Akhenaten with his queen and family dispensing honours and largesse, worshipping in the temple, driving in his chariot, dining and drinking Nefertiti is depicted as having equal stature with the king and her names are enclosed in a cartouche.

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Aten was represented by a disc at the top of royal scenes extended its rays towards the king and queen, and the rays end in their hands, holding the Ankh, the Egyptian cross symbol of eternal life, to the noses of the king and queen, a privilege which only they enjoy.

Akhenaten conceived of a single controlling intelligence, behind and above all beings including the gods. The king and queen were the major figures in the cult of Aten, whose festivals they celebrated with the local people with music, chanting, offering of fruits and flowers, and rituals in the open air. Military Coup Following the death of his father, Amenhotep III, he organized a great celebration at Amarna in his Year 12, for foreign princes bearing tribute because of his assumption of sole rule.

Akhenaten and Nefertiti appeared on window of appearance to receive the tribute of foreign missions coming from Syria, Palestine, Nubia and the Mediterranean islands, who offered him their presents.

A military unit of Shasu from the Bedouins of Sinai, guarded the royal procession. It was then that the king decided to abolish the worship of all gods in Egypt, except Aten.

Akhenaten gave orders to his troops instructing them to close all the temples, confiscate its estates, and sack the priests, leaving only Atens temples throughout the country. Units were dispatched to excise the names of the ancient gods wherever they were found written or engraved, a course that can only have created mounting new opposition to his already rejected authority.

This persecution, which entailed the closing of the temples, confiscating its property, the dispatch of artisans who entered everywhere to hack out the names of the deities from inscriptions, the banishment of the clergy, the excommunication of Amuns name, was supervised by the army.

Each time a squad of workmen entered a temple or tomb to destroy the name of Amun, it was supported by a squad of soldiers who came to see that the royal decree was carried out without opposition. The military garrison at Amarna had detachments of Sinai Bedouins and foreign auxiliaries, in addition of Egyptian units.

The loyalty of the army to Akhenaten was assured by the person of its commander Aye, brother of the kings mother who held posts among the highest in the infantry and chariotry, posts held by Yuya his father. The persecution of the old gods, however, proved to be hateful to the majority of Egyptians, including members of the army.

Ultimately the harshness of the persecution had a certain reaction upon the soldiers who, themselves, had been raised in the old beliefs, and rather than risk a wholesale defection and perhaps even a civil war. After all, the officers and soldiers themselves believed in the same gods whose images the king ordered them to destroy, they worshipped in the very temples which they were ordered to close.

A conflict arose between the king and his army. Akhenatens belief in one God, however, was too deep for him to allow any compromise with the priests.

Moses and Akhenaten: The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus

Horemheb, Pa-Ramses and Seti, planned a military coup against the king, and ordered their troops from the north and south to move towards Amarna. Aye, who received news of the troops movements, brought his chariots to guard Amarna. When the army and chariots came face to face at Amarnas borders, Aye advised the king to abdicate the throne to his son Tutankhaten, in order to save the dynasty.

Akhenaten agreed to abdicate and left Amarna with Pa-Nehesy, the high priest of Aten, and few of his followers to live in exile in area of Sarabit El-Khadem in southern Sinai. Back From Exile On hearing about Horemhebs death, Akhenaten decided to leave his exile in Sinai and come back to Egypt, in order to reclaim his throne.

The Secret History of Egypt at the Time of the Exodus

Since his abdication, he had been living in exile in southern Sinai, with few of his followers, for about twenty five years, during the reigns of Tutankhamun, Aye, and Horemheb. Here, Akhenaten lived among the Shasu Midianites Bedouins with whom he formed an alliance.

He strengthened the walls of the capital, built huge fortresses and dug ditches and pits between the city and the nearby river. On his return the Ethiopian king was astonished to see all these fortifications, which he thought were defences against a possible attack by an enemy.

When he found that the gates of the city were actually closed against him, he embarked on a war against the usurper, Bi'lam, that lasted nine years.

One of the soldiers who fought on the side of the king, according to the Talmud story, was Moses, who, after fleeing from Egypt, had made his way not to Midian in Sinai, as the Old Testament says, but to Ethiopia. He became a great favourite with the Ethiopian ruler and his companions with the result that, when the king died, this inner circle appointed Moses as their new king and leader. Bi'lam escaped and fled back to Egypt, becoming one of the magicians mentioned in the Scriptures.

And the Ethiopians placed Moses upon their throne and set the crown of State upon his head, and they gave him the widow of their king for a wife. But the Queen of Ethiopia, Adonith [Aten-it in Egyptian], who wished her own son by the dead king to rule, said to the people: "Why should this stranger continue to rule over you?

And the people of Ethiopia made him many rich presents, and dismissed him with great honours.

He was also considered the King of Israel during the sojourn in the desert.Its main streets ran parallel to the Nile with the most important of them, the Kings Way, connecting the citys most prominent buildings, including the Kings House where Akhenaten and his family lived their private family life.

Egyptian born Ahmed Osman, believes that he has been able to find the answers for these questions which bewildered scholars for centuries. While we know from the Old Testament that Moses was brought up in the royal palace, it does not suggest that he ever succeeded to the throne.

The evidence does not demand his conclusion, but his conclusion is supported by the evidence as presented.

Bi'lam escaped and fled back to Egypt, becoming one of the magicians mentioned in the Scriptures. Units were dispatched to excise the names of the ancient gods wherever they were found written or engraved, a course that can only have created mounting new opposition to his already rejected authority.

Some Egyptologists have gone as far as rejecting them as unacademic conjecture while others do not consider them worth refuting. Akhenaten challenged Pa-Ramses right to the throne.

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I do fancy blissfully. See my other posts. I'm keen on varzesh-e pahlavani.
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